Tag Archives: shotgunning

ShotKam3


The ShotKam is a lightweight video camera that attaches under your barrel and videotapes your shot and where your barrel is pointing during the swing and shot.

Serious shotgunners are probably familiar with SCI’s resident expert coaches Gil and Vicki Ash and how much a clever device called a ShotKam influences their teachings. The ShotKam is a lightweight video camera that attaches Continue reading ShotKam3

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She’s Not A Hunter? Not A Problem In Cordoba


“I’m not sleeping in a tent or going without a proper bathroom.”

That’s the first response many of us receive when asking our wives to come on a hunting adventure.  Hunting with your buddies is a ritual most often enjoyed without Continue reading She’s Not A Hunter? Not A Problem In Cordoba

Getting Better at Incoming/Passing Birds


If you have taken to heart the practice drills we’ve covered on flushing or outgoing birds, then the jump to the incoming birds will not be that difficult. When doing clinics on incoming shots, we separate the incoming bird into two categories — passing or decoying. These can be any bird except the flushing species such as quail, grouse or woodcock, which typically flush and then get back on the ground and “run like the dickens” to get away! Continue reading Getting Better at Incoming/Passing Birds

Shooting Flushing Birds…In the Field Tips!


While there are a variety of different flushing birds, and each could offer its own set of circumstances from terrain to different dog work, in most all flushing instances the bird is going away from the hunter. While each species varies in speed, they could differ greatly in line and distance from where they flush.

Inserting the muzzle under a pheasant and shadowing the bird until it chooses a line will allow for a smooth , efficient move to the line just ahead of the bird.

Perhaps the most common flushing birds in the U.S. are quail and pheasant with perdiz in South America. In any flushing situation, the dog work can make or break a great hunt from the pointing side of the flush to the retrieving side of the shot. When approaching the point, always focus on something at a distance, not on the dogs. Keeping your eyes very still and focused on something 30 to 50 yards out in front of the dogs allows you to pick up the movement of the flushing bird in your periphery and allows a much quicker move to focus on one of the birds. Once you have focused on one bird, move and mount your gun to the bird inserting just a touch underneath it. As soon as you know the direction of the bird, move the muzzles up just in front of the bird and take the shot. Continue reading Shooting Flushing Birds…In the Field Tips!