Tag Archives: shooting

SCI At London Olympics

Corey Cogdell is all smiles as she celebrates her victory recently at the U.S. Olympic Trials in Tucson, Arizona. Her win there assured that she will be shooting trap on the U.S. team at the Olympics in London, England this summer. Cory, from Alaska, is also a hunter and SCI advocate.

Safari Club International will be well represented this summer at the Olympics in London, England. Both woman shotgun competitors on the U.S. team are hunters and representatives of SCI. Kim Rhode, who will set a new all-time record if she medals this year, has been an SCI Life member and staunch supporter of the freedom to hunt since she was a child. This year, Kim will be competing in women’s skeet and trap. If she receives a medal in either event,

Kim Rhode, right, will be shooting skeet and trap during the upcoming Olympics in London, England. Kim, who is a lifelong hunter and SCI Life member, is shown here with her father, Richard, after she set another world record during the World Cup shoot earlier this spring in Tucson, Arizona.

she will have medaled in five consecutive Olympics–something that never has been done before. Corey Cogdell assured her spot on the U.S. Olympic team in women’s shotgun when she placed first in the qualifying shoot last month in Tucson, Arizona. Corey was a bronze medalist at the Olympics in Beijing four years ago.

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In Praise Of Rook Rifles

By Terry Wieland

One should never underestimate the capacity of the Victorians to take the commonplace and elevate it to the level of fine–or at least functional–art.

By an extraordinary coincidence, the emergence of modern guns and rifles in England occurred just as the phenomenon of Art Nouveau was sweeping Europe and the world. Gunmakers such as Boss and Woodward fashioned their products in accordance with Art Nouveau principles, and Holland & Holland’s famous engraving pattern for the Royal, adopted in the late 1890s, is one of the finest examples of the type to be found anywhere. Art Nouveau, for those who missed it, was a movement that advocated “art as a way of life,” and incorporated it in all manner of objects, from architecture to furniture to jewelry cases.

As a formal movement, it dates from 1895, but the trends in that direction existed for some decades before. Once it was formally recognized, however, gunmakers clutched the idea to their collective bosoms. Soon, every gunmaker sported a distinctive engraving pattern, and began sculpting locks and frames to Art Nouveau principles.

Westley Richards Sherwood Rook rifle
The Westley Richards “Sherwood,” built on a special Martini action with hand-detachable barrel and lock, chambered for the .300 Sherwood.

This approach trickled down to include not only “best” matched pairs intended for dukes and marquesses, but even the lowly rook rifle. This was a small game number that existed in England in one form or another since muzzleloading days, but it really took off with the development of the self-contained cartridge. Small-caliber muzzleloaders, known as “pea rifles” from the size of their bores and lead slugs, were used to shoot small game of all descriptions, from edible rabbits to predatory hawks. With the coming of breech loaders in the 1860s, cartridges were developed for this purpose, ranging in caliber from .220 to .360, and firing a 40- to 145-grain bullet at the usual blackpowder velocities of 1,200 to 1,500 feet per second.

Kynoch .300 Rook cartridges and box
Kynoch, who loaded ammunition for Westley Richards, called the Sherwood the .300 Extra Long, to differentiate it from its parent, the .300 Rook. It launched a 140-grain bullet at 1,400 feet per second, and was extremely accurate.

Generally, such game was shot at 50 to 75 yards, and rarely more than 100. They wanted bullets that would neither destroy edible meat nor carry too far and endanger bystanders. Such rifles came to be formally known as “rook and rabbit” rifles. Holland & Holland made a particular specialty of such rifles, reportedly selling some 5,000 of them in the late 1800s. In Birmingham, Westley Richards–always a rifle specialist–and W.W. Greener were noted for their rook rifles.

Various actions were used, but the miniature Martini, a scaled-down version of the military Martini-Henry, was a favorite for its strength and its accuracy. In 1900, Greener introduced a cartridge called the .300 Rook, and a year later, Westley Richards came out with a lengthened version which they named the .300 Sherwood. Kynoch, who loaded ammunition for it, called it the .300 Extra Long. Westley Richards also developed a special rifle called the Sherwood built on the Martini action. It was modified into a takedown with an easily removable barrel and a detachable lock mechanism held in place by a thumb screw.

The .300 Sherwood launched a 140-grain bullet at 1,400 fps, a considerable gain over the .300 Rook (80 grains, 1,200 fps).

In 1906, Henry Sharp, in his book Modern Sporting Gunnery, extolled the virtues of the .300 Sherwood as a big game killer, quoting hunters in British Columbia who used it to kill bears, bighorn sheep, and one verified caribou at 220 yards. Not something I would do, but there you have it.

Alas, the coming of the .22 Long Rifle rimfire cartridge killed off the old rook calibers, and many of these vintage rifles were rebarreled and reworked into .22s. The advent of restrictive firearm legislation in Britain caused many to be destroyed, while others were exported to Australia, Canada, and South Africa. Historian Donald Dallas estimates the total number of rook rifles made to be in the hundreds of thousands, and while many have gone to their reward, enough are still around to make it interesting at auctions. The old cartridges are a lot of fun to work with, and a “best” quality rook rifle is something to see. It is also affordable for those who admire English workmanship but can’t aspire to a big name double rifle.

Browning Shooting Bags

Browning has introduced a line of MOA shooting bags configured to suit a variety of range and field shooting conditions. The line includes a two-piece set, a utility shooting rest, and a window mount rest.

The two-piece set is what you traditionally find on a shooting bench. They’re designed to securely cradle the fore-end and toe of the stock and have a clever D-Ring with snap hook so you can join the two bags together for transportation or storage.

You need good bags to shoot accurately from a bench. Browning recently introduced a line of MOA shooting bags to help.

The Utility bag provides a fairly large platform for shooters who prefer to use only a fore-end rest and is sized to work well for handguns.

Though called a “window” mount, the V-shaped base of the MOA Window Mount Rest is equally effective straddling the railing of a metal treestand or the wall of a shooting house.

All are made of ballistic nylon and are filled with polymer pellets. Rubberized top and bottom surfaces keep your gun and the bag in place.