Tag Archives: Pheasant hunting

Pheasant Bonanza Really Is… A Bonanza

Picture it: pointers and flushers coordinatingly coursing in tandem through seemingly endless rolling fields with cover ranging from wild grasses to milo and standing corn, game birds exploding from the thick cover and shotguns blasting away. It was October in Nebraska. Continue reading Pheasant Bonanza Really Is… A Bonanza

Pheasants, Not QUITE Forever

Game conservation wars are never won — not for good.  Individual battles are won or lost, and some that seem lost may later be won — temporarily at least.  Elephant hunting in Botswana, and big-game hunting in the Okavango generally, are recent examples. Continue reading Pheasants, Not QUITE Forever

Shear Magic

When dealing with small game, fish and fowl game shears the way to go!

With the fall hunting season winding down, the only bird hunting left is that provided on hunt club properties where planted pheasant are in abundance. There may be those who look down on such activities, but any day in the field is better than staying home and I find that my Brittany spaniel is just as enthusiastic on planted birds as she is on wild birds.    Continue reading Shear Magic

Shooting Flushing Birds…In the Field Tips!

While there are a variety of different flushing birds, and each could offer its own set of circumstances from terrain to different dog work, in most all flushing instances the bird is going away from the hunter. While each species varies in speed, they could differ greatly in line and distance from where they flush.

Inserting the muzzle under a pheasant and shadowing the bird until it chooses a line will allow for a smooth , efficient move to the line just ahead of the bird.

Perhaps the most common flushing birds in the U.S. are quail and pheasant with perdiz in South America. In any flushing situation, the dog work can make or break a great hunt from the pointing side of the flush to the retrieving side of the shot. When approaching the point, always focus on something at a distance, not on the dogs. Keeping your eyes very still and focused on something 30 to 50 yards out in front of the dogs allows you to pick up the movement of the flushing bird in your periphery and allows a much quicker move to focus on one of the birds. Once you have focused on one bird, move and mount your gun to the bird inserting just a touch underneath it. As soon as you know the direction of the bird, move the muzzles up just in front of the bird and take the shot. Continue reading Shooting Flushing Birds…In the Field Tips!