Tag Archives: knives

Stone River Knives


Many times harder than conventional steel blades, the new zirconium oxide blades used by Stone River Knives are so durable that they rarely ever need sharpening.

The new Stone River Ceramic Hunting Knife features a drop-point pattern blade, with full-length tang construction, hollow ground profile and stag handle inserts. Image: Durwood Hollis

When it comes to knife-edge maintenance, most folks see it as the worst from of drudgery. Indeed, sharpening a knife is time consuming and often frustrating. A friend of mine hates dealing with the whole matter, so he just purchases a Continue reading Stone River Knives

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Essential Edges


Times may change, but the need for essential game care tools still persists.

It is a fact that over time, things change and that evolution is generally coupled with performance enhancement. Primitive men used some form of chipped stone edged tool or similar material to Continue reading Essential Edges

Case Triple Play


During a recent visit, a friend of mine was showing me his new rifle. As I handled the firearm, noticeable scratches were visible on the butt stock. When I inquired about the damage, my friend pointed to the knife clipped to his pants pocket. Apparently, when the stock Continue reading Case Triple Play

Hard As A Rockwell


The Rockwell hardness of any knife blade is the best indication of edge retention and sharpening ease.

The hardness of a knife blade is tested on a Rockwell Machine. The hardness read-out is indicated on the dial face at the top of the machine. Image: Durwood Hollis
The hardness of a knife blade is tested on a Rockwell Machine. The hardness read-out is indicated on the dial face at the top of the machine. Image: Durwood Hollis

In many of these columns you will see the phrase “Rockwell Hardness” when commenting on actual blade hardness. Invented by metallurgist Stanley P. Rockwell in 1919, the Rockwell Testing Instrument is able to determine the hardness of a wide range of materials, as well as many non-metallic materials. The instrument typically uses a cone-shaped diamond applied under pressure to penetrate the object tested. When a knife blade is tested, it is secured in a fixture and the diamond impressed into the blade under pressure. Initially, the first application of the diamond is used to establish a zero-reference point. Then, the diamond is applied Continue reading Hard As A Rockwell