Tag Archives: guns

Favortie Guns of SCI Member Jeff B.

Recently, our Director of Publications, Steve Comus, asked SCI members what makes, models and calibers of rifles they use on hunts these days. Jeffery B. was among the first to reply.

Jeff’s rifles include a .470 Nitro Express double, a custom bolt-action in .458 Lott, a .375 H&H, .338 Win Mag, .300 Win. Mag., a .30-’06, a 7mm-08, and six 7mm Rem. Mags.

“The vast majority of my rifles are 7mm Rem. Mags.,” Jeff writes. “Most of my rifles are Sako L61R actions with John Krieger barrels…I do not own a rifle that will not shoot sub MOA. I shoot most of my big game with Nosler or Swift A-Frame bullets.”

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Jeff has an impressive hunting background and has been an SCI member since 1983 including serving 15 years on the Board of the Wisconsin Chapter, four years there as Treasurer, two as Vice President and two as President. He has 91 international hunting trips–44 to Africa–and has collected 624 head of big game from five continents. Among those head, Jeff has taken seven buffalo, one lion and one 9-foot inland grizzly bear using 300-grain Swift A-Frame bullets in his .375 H&H. His three most recent buffalo needed only one shot each.

“I’m not a fan of monolithic bullets because I find them too long for caliber and not as good as lead-core or tungsten,” writes Jeff. “The atomic weight for the material is much less than lead or tungsten and penetration in a direct line is not as good. They work, but there are better.”

We’d like to know what rifles, ammo, optics, etc. other SCI members are using that are working well for them on hunts. If you’re an SCI member and have information you’d like to share, send the info along with photos and your SCI Member number to scomus@safariclub.org or write to:

Steve Comus, Director of Publications
Safari Club International
4800 West Gates Pass Road
Tucson, AZ 85745

If you’re not a member, take a minute to sign up.

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From The Hands Of The Master

The marrying of supreme function under the worst of conditions, with craftsmanship and beauty unlike any seen to that time, is the greatest legacy of the Manton brothers.

BY Terry Wieland

No matter how much you read about something, there is no substitute for personal experience. All my life, I have been haunted by the Manton brothers–John and Joseph–who are acknowledged as the fathers of the London fine gun trade. Before the Mantons, so tradition goes, guns were crude, unwieldy tools. After the Mantons, they were finely balanced, beautifully made, works of art.

In all likelihood, other gunmakers from the Manton era (1800 to 1835, roughly) who are less revered might argue that they, too, contributed to the transformation, and they may have a point. Where Joseph Manton particularly shone, however, was in the fact that so many of his craftsmen left his service to establish businesses of their own, preaching and practicing the Manton gospel of perfection in balance and workmanship.

These men included James Purdey, Charles Lancaster, and Thomas Boss–names that have resided at the “top of the tree” in London to this day. Although I have seen Manton guns in various collections, until recently I never had the opportunity to study one really closely, to put it together, and to see just how an original Manton feels in the hands.

The gun in question is an original flintlock Manton made around 1818, in the midst of the Regency era. Many Manton flintlocks were converted to caplocks, so finding one in its original state, in fine condition, is rare, and that rarity is reflected in their prices. A Manton flintlock might sell for $30,000, where a caplock conversion goes for $5,000. Having handled many different flintlock guns and rifles over the years, I have never been too impressed with their balance and feel, never mind the workmanship. The Manton, however, is a different proposition altogether. Although the barrels are 32 inches (made by Charles Lancaster, we should add) and the gun weighs more than seven pounds, it has better balance than most new and expensive shotguns you find today from reputable makers. How it must have felt to an officer just back from the Napoleonic Wars, accustomed to handling a Brown Bess musket, I can only imagine.

Colonel Peter Hawker, a veteran of the Peninsular War who was badly wounded at the Battle of Talavera and suffered the effects for the rest of his life, was a great Manton admirer, and extolled both his products and his disciples (Purdey and Lancaster especially) in his published works. Col. Hawker was one of the most interesting characters in the whole panoply of English shooting in the 1800s, who drove his ravaged body to shoot in all conceivable weather. His guns endured what his body did, so when Hawker praised a firearm, it was not merely for its charm or good looks.

This marrying of supreme function under the worst of conditions, with craftsmanship and beauty unlike any seen to that time, is the greatest legacy of the Manton brothers. It is even more astonishing when you consider the effects of black powder, with its corrosion and fouling.

The gun I examined, now almost 200 years old, was out of date when Lord Cardigan led the charge of the Light Brigade at Balaclava, and considered an antique when Lord Ripon was dropping birds at Sandringham. But my friend who owns the gun has loaded it, shot it, hunted with it, and even has a photograph of three grouse that he shot with this gun some years ago. He says it swings and shoots better than most modern shotguns. Sad to say, the craftsmanship that Joseph Manton inspired is now disappearing, even in England, where the few remaining fine gunmakers are incorporating CNC technology and slowly phasing out actual, trained craftsmen. A century from now, the Manton may exist as a living reproach for the skills that we have allowed to die.