Tag Archives: conservation

SCI Southern New Mexico Chapter Helps BLM And NM Game And Fish

Board members of the Southern New Mexico Chapter in Roswell, New Mexico, stand in front of one of the seven wildlife water catch systems that the chapter purchased for the BLM and New Mexico Department of Game and Fish. Each tank holds 1,800 gallons of water and will be placed on BLM and NM Game and Fish Department land northeast and east of Roswell. With the catch system installed, one inch of rainfall will funnel 560 gallons of water into the tank. In times of low rainfall, the BLM will fill the tanks from one of their fire truck tankers. These water systems are expected to benefit the prairie chicken population and the deer and antelope herds in the area. Standing left to right are BLM representative Randy Howard; Board Members Kim Talbot, Charlie Thompson, Richard Wacker and Hud Rhea; Regional Representative Herb Atkinson; Chapter President Ed Garrett; and Chapter Member Bart Hanson.

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Latin American Conservation Officials Trained In Texas, Thanks To Safari Club International

By J.Thomas Saldias, Regional Representative

Thanks to the efforts of the SCI International Affairs and Development Committee (IADC) chaired by Norbert Ullmann, Latin American government officials were trained in the management of sport hunting and other conservation topics at Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD) HQ in Austin, Texas.

“Texas Parks and Wildlife Department is proud to be a host for this important professional exchange,” said Maria Araujo, International Liaison for TPWD and coordinator for this event. “SCI has been instrumental in providing the funding to bring government officials to Texas so they can experience “in situ” the management model for which Texas is recognized worldwide,” Araujo said.

Delegates shown left to right are Leonel Duran (Chihuaha); Maria Araujo, Int’l Liaison TPWD; Rene Celis (Tamaulipas); Alejandra Peña (Chihuahua); Rosa Vento (Peru) and Alejandro Donoso (Chile).

Alejandro Donoso, Director of the Servicio Agricola Ganadero (Chile); Rene Celis, Director of Operations for the Comisión Estatal de Vida Silvestre from the Mexican State of Tamaulipas; Rosa Vento from the Dirección General Forestal y de Fauna Silvestre (Peru); and Leonel Duran and Alejandra Peña from the Mexican State of Chihuahua were exposed to the different areas of the agency and successfully completed a hunter education course offered by Mrs. Araujo, who is also an Area Chief Instructor for TWPD. Delegates also participated in firearms handling and live-fire sessions. Delegates from El Salvador and Paraguay were unable to attend, cancelling their participation due to problems that arouse at their respective agencies days before their scheduled departures.

“This is a great opportunity for all of us”, said Alejandra Peña of Chihuahua. “This course has changed my perspective about sport hunting,” said Rosa Vento of Peru. “This experience is a great addition to my professional performance and we certainly would like to apply what we are learning here in our respective countries,” said Alejandro Donoso from Chile.

This is the last of a series of exchanges facilitated by SCI-IADC with the collaboration of TPWD. In the past, delegates of Peru and Paraguay visited TPWD HQ during the past two years.

SCI is the leader in sport hunting and it is imperative to provide training opportunities for the officials in charge of sport hunting in those countries were SCI has been assisting our local chapters in creating the legal framework for the activity. We will continue supporting and expanding these efforts in Latin America, said Norbert Ullmann, chair of the IADC.

SCIF Funds Conservation Projects

Safari Club International Foundation has contributed $537,590 in the past six months to fund worldwide wildlife conservation projects.

“The research programs selected by SCIF’s professional biologists inform wildlife managers and policy makers on critical wildlife management needs worldwide,” said SCIF President Joe Hosmer. “SCIF strives to ensure management decisions are based on the best available science.”

SCIF donated $350,000 to fund multiple predator/prey projects in the U.S. and Canada. Conservation projects include Predator/Prey studies observing rates of whitetail deer fawn survival in Michigan and Wisconsin, elk survival in Montana, and caribou survival in Newfoundland. The results of these projects will help properly manage both predators and prey in systems where both exist. Donations were also made to wildlife population research and enhancement programs including mule deer in the Eastern Mojave Desert, brown bears on Kodiak Island, black bears in Missouri, and moose in Alaska, among others.

The most recent project is a partnership with Alaska Department of Fish and Game’s Kenai Moose Project. SCIF donated $20,000. In multiple African nations, SCIF has given more than $123,000 to wildlife conservation and human-wildlife conflict programs.

Most recently, SCIF donated $30,000 for the upcoming African Wildlife Consultative Forum, which will be held in Botswana. SCIF also continues to fund lion research in Zambia to improve the accuracy of aging lions in their natural environment.

Being able to accurately age lions in the field will assist range states develop appropriate lion harvest regulations to ensure sustainability.

“Throughout the year, SCIF contributes over $1 million to wildlife research, management and anti-poaching programs. As an international organization, SCIF continues to increase our financial impact for sustainable-use conservation and we hope more organizations can follow our lead,” said Hosmer.

Contributions to wildlife species made during the past 6 months include:

  • Lion (Southern Africa) $30,000
  • Elephant (Zimbabwe) $25,200
  • Leopard (Zimbabwe, Namibia) $18,000
  • Wildlife Genetics (Africa) $20,000
  • Brown Bear (Alaska) $50,000
  • Black Bear (Missouri) $25,000
  • Elk (Montana. & Ontario)$69,800
  • Whitetail deer (Mich. & Wisc$75,000
  • Mule Deer (Calif. & Colorado) $40,880
  • Moose (Alaska) $33,500
  • Caribou (Newfoundland) $8,550
  • Bighorn Sheep (Mont. & Wyo) $31,500
  • Dall Sheep (Alaska) $5,000
  • Predator ID Manual (Intl) $10,000
  • Conservation Matching Grants $8,000
  • African Wildlife Forum $30,000

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New Hampshire Antlerless-Only Permits On Sale

whitetail does in snowNew Hampshire’s Wildlife Management Unit M antlerless-only deer permit sales are now underway for 2012. Up to 4,000 hunters may purchase these special permits. They’re sold on a first-come, first-served basis at a price of $13 for a one-deer permit, and $26 for a two-deer permit.

You must have a current New Hampshire hunting or archery license to apply, and you can apply only once each year. The permits are available online or in person at the Fish and Game Department in Concord. Hunters can also print a mail-in application, or call 603-271-3422 to request a mail-in application. Incomplete, illegible and duplicate applications will not be considered.

The antlerless-only permits for Unit M have been issued since 1997 to help stabilize the size of the herd in southeastern New Hampshire.  It’s a good example of wildlife managers using hunting as a management tool to minimize deer-human conflicts and to keep deer densities at a healthy level.