Latin American Conservation Officials Trained In Texas, Thanks To Safari Club International


By J.Thomas Saldias, Regional Representative

Thanks to the efforts of the SCI International Affairs and Development Committee (IADC) chaired by Norbert Ullmann, Latin American government officials were trained in the management of sport hunting and other conservation topics at Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD) HQ in Austin, Texas.

“Texas Parks and Wildlife Department is proud to be a host for this important professional exchange,” said Maria Araujo, International Liaison for TPWD and coordinator for this event. “SCI has been instrumental in providing the funding to bring government officials to Texas so they can experience “in situ” the management model for which Texas is recognized worldwide,” Araujo said.

Delegates shown left to right are Leonel Duran (Chihuaha); Maria Araujo, Int’l Liaison TPWD; Rene Celis (Tamaulipas); Alejandra Peña (Chihuahua); Rosa Vento (Peru) and Alejandro Donoso (Chile).

Alejandro Donoso, Director of the Servicio Agricola Ganadero (Chile); Rene Celis, Director of Operations for the Comisión Estatal de Vida Silvestre from the Mexican State of Tamaulipas; Rosa Vento from the Dirección General Forestal y de Fauna Silvestre (Peru); and Leonel Duran and Alejandra Peña from the Mexican State of Chihuahua were exposed to the different areas of the agency and successfully completed a hunter education course offered by Mrs. Araujo, who is also an Area Chief Instructor for TWPD. Delegates also participated in firearms handling and live-fire sessions. Delegates from El Salvador and Paraguay were unable to attend, cancelling their participation due to problems that arouse at their respective agencies days before their scheduled departures.

“This is a great opportunity for all of us”, said Alejandra Peña of Chihuahua. “This course has changed my perspective about sport hunting,” said Rosa Vento of Peru. “This experience is a great addition to my professional performance and we certainly would like to apply what we are learning here in our respective countries,” said Alejandro Donoso from Chile.

This is the last of a series of exchanges facilitated by SCI-IADC with the collaboration of TPWD. In the past, delegates of Peru and Paraguay visited TPWD HQ during the past two years.

SCI is the leader in sport hunting and it is imperative to provide training opportunities for the officials in charge of sport hunting in those countries were SCI has been assisting our local chapters in creating the legal framework for the activity. We will continue supporting and expanding these efforts in Latin America, said Norbert Ullmann, chair of the IADC.

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Benefits Of Safari Club International


By John Whipple, SCI President

There are so many benefits to being a member of SCI that it is difficult to list them all in one short article. It is the incredible breadth and depth of the SCI experience that separates it from other organizations in the outdoor world. First, of course, are the basic member benefits that include:

General Membership

Your Safari Club International membership gives you access to an array of events, information sources and products that help you maximize your hunting experiences. Member Benefits include:

Optional benefits available to members:

SCI’s Annual Hunter’s Convention is a Members-only event, and just one of the many benefits of joining SCI.

Members-only Insurance Discounts.

Guns: Protects your Firearms and accessories from loss and damage, worldwide, 24/7.

Trophies: This unique program insures your Trophy Collection against theft and damage while providing the necessary funds to re-hunt the animal.

Travel Protection: Insures you against Financial Loss from trip complications beyond your control, plus medical insurance and an emergency Medical Evacuation guarantee.

Guides & Outfitters Protection: This program has been designed by SCI’s long time insurance consultants in order to provide specialized insurance coverage for the unique risks faced by hunting guides.

Chapter membership is among the most important benefits for many of us, because chapters provide the face-to-face camaraderie that literally brings home the critical missions of SCI.

It is at the Chapter level that each of us can personally make a big and direct difference. It is where we work on meaningful projects and where we meet to celebrate the hunting traditions.

Recently, SCI has begun to reach out even more than before by aligning ourselves with other organizations in the outdoor industry. These other organizations are called Affiliates, and to date we have 77 Affiliate organizations that, when combined with the SCI membership, represent a total of almost 9 million hunters and friends of hunters worldwide. Our influence is growing.

This is a significant number by any measure, and one that adds impact in the various social and political circles when SCI speaks for you, its members, and all other hunters in the world.

SCI is the finest group of hunters the world has ever known. Please join me in getting the word out about the fantastic things that we are all able to do together.

Tell your friends and fellow hunters about SCI and feel free to use the information above to start the conversation. The more that people know about SCI, the better we look to them, and the better we look, the more they will understand that they also need to be a part of this fantastic organization.

Indeed, SCI is local, regional, statewide, nationwide and worldwide. SCI is everywhere. Be proud. Let us all tell the world about this great organization and take pride in our membership. As members, we are all special. Thank you for your support of the organization and its critical missions.

Join SCI here.

Hair’s Breadth Bear


Base camp near Cold Bay with Guide Roger Morris and Brent Jones in the center, Dan at right.

By Kurt J. Jaeger

It was four o’clock in the morning when I woke up. As quietly as possible, I peeled myself drowsily from the down feather sleeping bag and shoved myself past the in-unison snoring guides to the tent entrance. I carefully pulled up the zipper where cold air beat into my face. Thousands of stars blinked from the cloudless sky.

For a while, I stared over the water to where the tiny town of Cold Bay showed some puny lights, then scanned the low waves splashing rhythmically against the coarse stones at the beach a dozen yards away. In the east, the frozen peaks around Mount Pavlof stood out clearly against the velvet black sky and conveyed the impression of an immense expanse of frozen solitude. I shivered.

Taking one last sweeping look over the steep bank behind the tents, the enormous mountain range beyond and the open bay leading into the Bering Straight, I slipped back into the warm tent and the even warmer sleeping bag. However, I couldn’t find the peace for a restful sleep anymore. The prospect to experience the coming day in bright sunshine seemed to work on me like a stimulant, with the nervous thought of it being the last hunting day bothering me.

Based on my experiences over the past six days, I had definitely reached the conclusion that the place of birth of terrible weather had to be in this part of the world. There had also been days when I had several times cursed my decision to come here in the first place, to chase the big bear with my pals from “AAA Alaskan Outfitters” with whom I had hunted successfully two years before for Dall sheep in the Wrangels.

There had been days of driving snow, sleet and low stratus clouds chased by roaring, icy winds with a chill factor of no less than thirty degrees below. Days that taught to me the hard way what “freezing to the bones” really meant. Six days in the hinterland at the base of enormous mountains, always on the lookout for traces on the ground, or the sight of the enormous Kodiak bear.

As I thought of the past week, I drew my head deeper into the sleeping bag. Instinctively, I felt for the rough skin of my nose, which had turned somewhat insensitive, and thanked God that the frostbite there was only minor. My toes seemed it to be worse off. Then I thought of what my hunting guide, Roger Morris, had revealed the night before–that this morning, we would board the inflatable boat and call at another hunting camp along the coast to the West and try our luck there.  I was curious about the new area, and hope came flooding back again. Roger had sounded confident, and I knew how hard he would again try for my success. If not, I would fly back to Europe empty handed, without the ultimate result of hunting, though I would be happy about the experience itself.

Now and then a hunter needs success, and lying there I figured that after the hardships I had been through, I deserved some credit in the accounting book of Diana. It had been a damned cold spring with much snow in the mountains and it seemed that the chances of getting a bear were small, although we had twice encountered bears at the base of the mountains. In the first instance, approaching darkness prevented us from getting any closer.  The second opportunity turned out to be hopeless since the bear had traveled fast along the foothills of the mountain range without ever stopping.

Bear at shore after tumbling down from plateau with author and Guide Roger Morris.

We were greatly disappointed when late in the afternoon of the sixth day we reached the steep bank and looked down onto the base camp to find no bearskins spread out drying on racks.  Instead, we found a note in one of the tents informing us that the three Texans in camp had thrown the towel in on the second day. The biting cold and constant, howling winds were apparently something they did not care for too much. To soften the impact of the bad news, they had at least left a few bottles of expensive whiskey behind for our welfare.

The pale light of the breaking day penetrated slowly through the tent walls. Beside me Roger started to move, then blinked sleepily around him.

“Good morning!” I called out happily.

His astonished look was a confused question mark. I pointed excitedly to the tent entrance.

“I am already awake for a long time and you should really have a look outside. You can’t imagine what a wonderful day awaits you out there,” I said.

Roger did not say a word. He stepped carefully over Dan who still kept snoring and pulled up the zip-fastener. Two minutes later he came back again, a wide grin showed on his bearded face.

“Seems to be your day alright!” he said tersely, then climbed over Dan once more and started to tend to the camping stove. Soon, a busy hustle and bustle and clattering of pots and dishes finally woke Dan from his carpentry. Everybody was up and soon busy rolling sleeping bags and rubber mats and in agreement that the good weather called for immediate action. While Roger was serving the steaming coffee, the first beams of the rising sun reached our tents. The glaring light even dazzled off the material on the inside.

The preparation of the rubber dinghies was next. The outboard motors had to be fastened and the tanks filled for the long journey over the water. Roger, Dan and I took the lead with our boat. Brent followed with a new hunter and most of the gear. The sun shone warming our faces. To our left, the enormous mountain chain covered with ice and snow was overwhelming and impressive in their massive solidity below an azure-blue sky. The incredible harsh world here on the Aleutian chain, untouched since creation millions of years ago, let me feel how small and insignificant we human beings are on this planet.

Roger steered the boat parallel to the coast approximately five hundred meters offshore so as not to disturb any loitering bears with the engine noise. Time passed as we progressed, and in the distance I could see the catchments area of Lennards Harbor as we scanned the steep coastline sliding slowly past us with our glasses.

I don’t remember who spotted the moving brown spot way up on the coastal escarpment first. “Bear!” Roger shouted suddenly and simultaneously throttled back the outboard motor. At the same time we saw how the big brown spot headed with powerful strides for a thicket of alder. It was a bear all right, however, I had not been able judge his size before he disappeared into a thicket. Continue reading Hair’s Breadth Bear

Coming Soon…


By Scott Mayer

I wanted to give SCI Members a “head’s up” about a new and exciting product we’ll be bringing online soon–My Hunt ReportTM is the source for the reports, photos and videos from SCI Members that help you choose the best outfitters for the best hunting trophies and experiences!

My Hunt ReportTM is planned as a searchable database for reports filed by SCI Members on outfitters, guides and hunting conditions around the world. All SCI Members will be encouraged to participate, and those who do will be rewarded with a one-stop place to store the photos and videos relating to their hunts for everyone to see.

Here are just some of the features we envision from My Hunt ReportTM:

  • Hunting conditions as told by fellow SCI Members.
  • Your hunting photos and videos.
  • Your trophies, records and awards.
  • Access from any computer, tablet, or Smartphone anywhere in the world.
This is only a mock-up for conceptual purposes, but it shows just some of the features we envision to help you share your success stories and make new ones.

With My Hunt ReportTM , search for last-minute hunting opportunities, or really drill down and plan the ultimate adventure.  Show your trophies and hunting videos to other members—even on the Convention floor.  Find where the biggest trophies are coming from, and what outfitter will put you on them. Get ideas for your trophy room.

We’re working hard to bring this to you soon. In the meantime, please be thinking of your notable hunts, and any exciting video or exceptional trophies you want others to see in your personal My Hunt ReportTM. Stay tuned for more information including contacts and how to have your own My Hunt ReportTM .

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