Category Archives: Dangerous Game

Species of the Week – Cape or Southern Buffalo

Syncerus caffer caffer

Cape Buffalo map F028Bufalo del Cabo (Sp), Kaffernbüffel, Schwarzbüffel (G), Buffle du Cap, Buffle noir (F). The common name “Cape buffalo” is misleading, because this subspecies is native to many parts of Africa besides the Cape of Good Hope region (where it is extinct); however, that is what most people call it.

DESCRIPTION Shoulder height 60-65 inches (150-165 cm). Weight 1,400-1,800 lbs (650-800 kg).

The Cape buffalo is the largest and darkest (black, or nearly so) of the African buffaloes. Its heavy horns curve outward and downward from massive bosses to well below skull level, then circle upward, inward and slightly backward.

DISTRIBUTION Savanna areas in Kenya, southern Somalia, Uganda except in the northwest, Rwanda, Burundi and Tanzania; all of Angola except for the far northwest; Katanga Province in southeastern Congo (K); Zambia, Malawi, Mozambique, the Caprivi Strip in Namibia, northern Botswana, Zimbabwe, and northeastern Transvaal in South Africa. Has been reintroduced on private ranches in other parts of South Africa.

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African Buffalo in Savage Sudan An Armchair Safari with Abel Chapman

I had not specifically included buffalo in my Sudan program, not because I already had specimens, but because previous experience taught me that any systematic pursuit of these great bovines involves a certainty of hard work and endurance that tests one’s physical powers to the utmost. Should luck or chance throw a buffalo across my path, then fine. Continue reading African Buffalo in Savage Sudan An Armchair Safari with Abel Chapman

Preliminary 2017 Pennsylvania Bear Harvest Results

Hunters during the final day of Pennsylvania’s statewide bear season harvested 168 bears, raising the 2017 statewide season harvest to 1,796 – an approximately 30 Continue reading Preliminary 2017 Pennsylvania Bear Harvest Results

SCI Adopts Policy On Captive Bred Lions

Considering that the practice of the captive breeding of lions for the purpose of hunting has doubtful value to the conservation of lions in the wild, and considering that such hunting is not consistent with SCI’s criteria for estate hunting, the SCI Board has adopted the following policy:

  • SCI opposes the hunting of African lions bred in captivity.
  • This policy takes effect on February 4, 2018 and applies to hunts taking place after adoption of this policy and to any Record Book entry related to such hunts.
  • SCI will not accept advertising from any operator for any such hunts, nor will SCI allow operators to sell hunts for lions bred in captivity at the SCI Annual Hunters’ Convention.