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John S.–Favorite Rifles

SCI Member John S.  has a favorite rifle chambered in .308 Winchester. He writes:

“I have hunted in Africa six times. On the first safari I took a Winchester Model 70 .375 and a Sako 7mm Magnum. The rifles arrived three days late, so I borrowed a Model 70 .308 Featherweight and really liked the way it fit me.

“In hindsight, I went unprepared, as I had not practiced shooting much. The 7mm Magnum just did not fit me well or something. I never could shoot it well. Later, I found a small chip at the muzzle. It shot better after that was repaired.

“However, I shot the .308 well and bought one for my next safari (hit a kudu on the run at distance).

“On safaris two through five, I took the .308 and the .375 (got two elephants, two Cape buffalo and a lion, plus much plains game). I am able to adjust the triggers easily on Model 70s and am comfortable shooting both. I don’t appear to be bothered by recoil and even use the .375 for elk (also, killed an elk with the .308).

“On safari six, I took the .308 and a Husqvarna .358 Norma Magnum. The .358’s trigger was too light and became dangerous. I stopped using it after three animals and used the .308 the remainder of the time.

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“I use the .308 on all my deer and African hunts (unless my son is along and then he uses it), and I have to say it is my favorite because it is very accurate, has a nice trigger, and I am very comfortable with it.

“The .375 would be my next choice, but there’s not too much you can hunt with it in the United States.

“I started reloading about two years ago and took all reloaded ammo with me on the last trip to Africa.

“I use 180-grain Seirras and Barnes X-Bullets for the .308, .300 Winchester Magnum, and .30-06.

“I went in a Wal-Mart many years ago and they were selling 180-grain Winchester Power Points for $6 a box. I bought all they had and went to other Wal-Marts for more. The price went down to $4 a box and I cleaned them out. So, I am a 180-grain shooter and will be for a while. (The only reason I can think of for Wal-Mart to put that ammo on sale is that Winchester was changing the style and color of the box. Doesn’t make sense.)”

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Beating Records Set The Pace At ISSF Shotgun World Cup Shoot In USA

Kim Rhode, a Life member of SCI and Sables, talks with youngsters moments after setting a new world record in women’s skeet at the World Cup event in Tucson, Arizona USA.

There was a definite Safari Club presence at the ISSF Shotgun World Cup shoot, held in Tucson, Arizona, USA during the last week of March where several records were met or set. SCI, SCI Foundation and the Arizona Chapter of SCI were major sponsors of the shoot. The international/global nature of the World Cup event, and the fact that international competitors travel globally with firearms, made the connection with SCI both logical and obvious.

U.S. shooter Kim Rhode, a Life member of both SCI and Sables, set the first new world record early in competition. Rhode, then a four- and now five-time Olympic medalist, shot a perfect 75 in competition. She missed one target in the finals for a total of 99/100. Kim beat the previous world record of 74/75 set by Elena Little (Great Britain) at the 2005 ISSF Shotgun World Cup in Belgrade, Serbia. The 74/75 record had been equaled 13 times since then including Rhode, who equaled the mark twice in 2010 at the ISSF World Cup in Beijing (China) and at the ISSF World Cup Final in Izmir (Turkey).

Great Britain’s Peter Robert Russell Wilson, center, set a new world record in trap doubles. Silver medal went to Malta’s William Chetcuti, left, and bronze went to USA’s Joshua Richmond, right.

“It’s great to start the season in this way, on my home turf, especially as we are getting closer to the Olympics,” Rhode said.

Rhode, already qualified for the 2012 Olympic Games in London after winning the 2010 World Championships, is trying to make Olympic history by becoming the first U.S. athlete competing in an individual sport to win five medals in five consecutive Olympic Games.

Chattanooga Area Chapter Helps Nab Poachers

From YouTube, here is a collection of videos from the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency  of poachers shooting a decoy deer donated to the Officers by the Chattanooga Area Chapter of Safari Club International (SCI). It is illegal to shoot from a roadway, and as you can see, there are those who choose to disobey the law.

The poachers are shooting at a robo deer fully donated by the Chattanooga Area SCI. The cameras used in the filming were also donated to the Officers by the SCI Chapter. The arrests have resulted in thousands of dollars in fines and loss of hunting licenses to the offenders.

Favorite Guns of SCI Member Jeffery P.

When asked what his go-to hunting gear consists of, SCI Member Jeffrey P. responds:

“My regular hunting partner and I have been to Africa twice.  Just returning on 10 June from the East Cape.  We hunted plains game both times using .30-‘06.  On this recent trip, we added another friend, also using a .30-‘06.  The battery included one Kimber, one Ruger, and one FN-made Model 70.  On our first trip I used Black Hills Gold ammunition with 180-grain Barnes Triple Shock bullets.  My partner used handloads with 165-grain Barnes TTSX.  Due to difficulty in finding Black Hills, I switched to Barnes VOR-TX 180-grain TTSX, while my partner stayed with his handloads.  Our new guy also used VOR-TX in 180 grain.

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“Performance from the .30-‘06 was excellent.  All of my shots, with the exception of the blue wildebeest, were pass-throughs including a 252-yard kudu shoulder/neck shot.  The wildebeest was shot on the shoulder at 90 yards and the bullet recovered on the opposite side.  A number of shots on zebra, warthog, and gemsbok were angled shots with performance also being excellent.

“I took a .375 Ruger on my first trip, and a .243 Model 70 on the second trip, but ended up shooting the .30-‘06.  No fault with the guns or calibers–just the way hunting goes sometimes.  My Model 70 wears a Swarovski Z6 2X12, so sometimes the scope made the choice. I also shoot a custom .338 Remington that I use for elk, but like the lighter ‘06 for Africa.

“There has been a lot of press on the old standby.  If I only owned one gun it would be an ‘06.  I started my twin boys on deer with a Model 70 Featherweight and a Ruger Hawkeye. That Ruger was used by one of my pals on our most recent trip. The ammunition these days is so good that the use of magnums out to 300-350 yards is just unnecessary. We sight the guns in at 2 inches high at 100 yards resulting in a 200 yard zero.”