SCI Members Share Their Success


The Safari Club International Record Book is one of the most comprehensive data bases of wildlife science in existence and it’s thanks to our members who continue to increase our knowledge of wildlife from around the globe. Help expand our data base and document your hunting legacy! Here are some SCI members who have recently added to their own personal hunting heritage.

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Powderhorn Ranch Becomes Texas’ Newest Wildlife Management Area


More than 15,000 acres of the Powderhorn Ranch along the Texas coast in Calhoun County, prime unspoiled coastal prairie, is now a state wildlife management area. The newest crown jewel in the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD) system is the result of a unique conservation land acquisition coalition led by the Texas Parks and Wildlife Foundation (TPWF). Continue reading Powderhorn Ranch Becomes Texas’ Newest Wildlife Management Area

Tennessee Valley Chapter Offers Unique Hunt In Scotland!


SCI’s Tennessee Valley Chapter holds its annual “Night of the Hunter” fundraiser on March 23, 2019 at the Chattanooga Convention Center.

This year the featured auction item is a unique choice of hunts in Scotland. Package includes airport transfers, exclusive lodging and meals and the chance to harvest two roe bucks.

The alternative choice is a hunt for red stag in the high heather hills of Scotland. This package also includes airport transfers, meals, luxury accommodations and the option to upgrade to a monster stag from one of the best private red deer herds in all of Scotland.

More details are available on the Chapter’s web page.

Hoosier Bigger Buck State?


By Scott Mayer

It’s pretty amazing what professional wildlife managers can do to manipulate animal populations to meet specific cultural, economic, or geographic needs.  For example, when I was growing up in rural Virginia, the rule when deer hunting was “bucks only,” as the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries was managing the herd for growth. It succeeded. In fact, some would say they over succeeded as today Virginia has liberal antlerless deer opportunities as the Department works to either sustain or in some places even reduce deer populations.

Indiana is no different in managing its deer herd to suit that state’s needs as evidenced by the Indiana Natural Resources Commission recently approving an indefinite extension of a management tool commonly referred to as the “one-buck” rule.

Indiana is no different in managing its deer herd to suit that state’s needs as evidenced by the Indiana Natural Resources Commission recently approving an indefinite extension of a management tool commonly referred to as the “one-buck” rule. That rule limits hunters in Indiana to only one antlered deer during the regular archery, firearms and muzzleloader deer seasons.

The rule was first applied in 2002 and was set to sunset after a five-year period. I spoke with Chad Stewart, the deer biologist for Indiana, about the “one-buck” rule, its background, and the effect it has had on the deer herd and hunting in Indiana.

Stewart wasn’t with the Commission when the rule was implemented, but his understanding is that sportsmen and women lobbied for the rule to manage the herd for more mature deer. Steward explained that in 2001, the year before the one-buck rule was applied, 56% of the bucks harvested were yearlings. He recalls that at the time, there was some push-back from some groups of hunters, but the rule was renewed in 2007 and today 65% of Indiana hunters support the rule, and most of those support the rule “overwhelmingly.”

According to Stewart, the popularity has a lot to do with hunters seeing more bucks, and the bucks they are seeing are larger and more mature. In fact, in 2011 (the latest year for which there is data) the yearling buck harvest was only 39%. As Indiana’s one-buck rule demonstrates, when hunters and game departments work together and use sound wildlife management practices, great things can happen.

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